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equality

You Don't Want Equality!

equality

Over the years I have noticed a few things about people who talk about promoting change and equality. Specifically, I have encountered several of these people and groups in high school/college–I graduated in ’09 and ’12. But in the end, I am often confused as to what their end goal is. I mean sure they say it’s to create opportunities for their specified group, making them equal to everyone outside of the group, but is that really the case? Is the end goal truly complete integration?

People often complain about certain social structures and the discrepancies between social groups, but they always complain to and discuss within their group and not directly to the “other.” When I was a graduate student at Fordham University, my professor asked me if I was in any social clubs, e.g. BSU, aka Black Student Union. I replied, “I don’t do those,” and of course he immediately questioned why. I expressed that although I understand the purpose of the separated groups and the way in which they are conveniently formed, I’d be more obliged to join a diversity group instead—all inclusive and having various issues addressed amongst one another. He understood; and you know what else he told me? As a man of mixed race, Dominican and African-American, he happened to be the sponsor of two social groups: the Hispanic group and the African-American group (I don’t remember their acronyms, sorry). One day, he proposed to each group the opportunity of joining as one. He explained the advantages of the collaboration and how they could unite resources, expand their reach, discuss issues that each of them face separately, together, and possibly with one another, etc. Their response: no, we want to stay within our own groups; we don’t need to join with them.

Seriously people? I call bullshxt. We protest equality, we say we want integration and unity, but when the time comes we show our true colors—we really want superiority. We want our chance to “be the man.”

Yes, I know that some people are expressing themselves and joining with others to create change– I salute them and this isn’t for them. But if you immediately become defensive, this is for you. I need you to truly evaluate what it is that you want. When you speak about change and equality are you always referring to people as “them,” “they” and “those.” When you cry out in outrage is only to those who look like you or is it to everyone? & are you always on the defense?

And to those who complain about people who are actually in these groups: have you ever tried to join one? Have you ever attended a function or event that was directed toward a cause that may not be directly linked to you? Do you listen when these people are speaking, or do you immediately write them off because you assume that what they have to say isn’t relevant to you? Something that I appreciate about LGTBQ groups is that they usually present their groups as a Gay-Straight Alliance. They understand the importance in the ally.

Look, I get it, I promise I do. When I went to a student diversity leadership conference in high school, I broke down like a baby in front of my peers–it was only about 8 people & 2-3 were teachers. I didn’t realize how much certain behaviors affected me and that people’s ignorant comments and snide remarks bothered me so much. But, so many of them behaved in that way due to the lack of exposure to people that didn’t look like or grow up like them. &People can’t learn about something if no one ever teaches them–that’s where you come in. You know the White guys in high school never knew that Black women are not born with straight hair, but have to chemically alter it every month. Lol. But why would they? –especially before the “natural hair movement!” And that sort of thing is trivial, so imagine other things.

 It’s unfortunate that we don’t know how to speak to one another. It is unfortunate that over the years so much anger has been festering and tension has been building. But I ask that you try a little harder. Try harder to communicate with the person on the outside. Or when someone on the inside invites you to see the view, go and check it out! That way, there will be no longer be an outside and inside. It’ll be one view, one goal. And this is NOT limited to race; it’s just what I experience the most. This spans the entire spectrum people. You will never know that my cause is your cause if we don’t join in efforts together. 

If you want equality, prove it.

Lynella!

religion, global, intermarriage

Would You Date Outside Your Religion?

So, this is something I’d written a couple of years ago and I’m bringing it back to life. I haven’t actively dated in quite some time, but this question never evades me. While watching Grey’s Anatomy, fictional, I know, the relationship between Dr. Jackson Avery and Dr. April Kepner got me thinking again–how do people interfaith marriages work? She is very firm in her Christian faith, and Jackson doesn’t believe in God at all. In the beginning, their marriage was tested because not only did he call her faith silly and God fictional, they disagreed on how they would raise the kids, etc. So, I’m wondering what you guys think? Read what I had to say below.

religion, global, intermarriage

Religion, it’s so dividing. To say that most of them believe in some form of the same thing, they sure do know how to ostracize one another. Christians hating Christians, Jews shunning Jews, Muslims disowning Muslims. It’s shameful to see because religion should bring unity.

But I shall not expand on such things. What I’ve been thinking about is intermarriage, specifically in reference to religion. I’ve seen and heard of people marrying others outside of their religion, but it usually doesn’t last. Or when it does, I often wonder how. It seems that one would have to be slightly less committed to their religion to conjoin with that of another, especially those that are so contrasting.

shwetha and jeff, wedding, interracial, intermarriage, religion, hindu, jewish shwetha and jeff, wedding, interracial, intermarriage, religion, hindu, jewish

For example, a Baptist and Methodist marrying is not nearly as extreme as a Christian and Buddhist joining in matrimony. Even Christians and Muslims believe in the same God, with there being some differences between the two. But how can one who believes in, say, Jesus build a family with one who worships several gods?

I am not saying in any way that these groups cannot coexist with one another–I have friends across all the spectrums: religion, race, sexuality, age. But when you marry a person, you build your family’s foundation on shared values, correct? If a Christian believes that Jesus is the way and the Savior, how do they cope with the fact that, according to their beliefs, their Buddhist partner is going to hell? I don’t understand.

I only ask because I, myself, am a Christian and I love God with all of my heart. But I am also accepting of all people–obviously bigotry is not tolerated, but that’s not based on social attributes, but rather poor and ignorant attitudes. I love all people, as I believe Christ would have and does. Sure, I may not agree with everything that someone does or believes, but at the end of the day I do not think more highly of myself than I ought to and I judge not others.

Here is a South Indian & Jewish wedding. They had two ceremonies and both are beautiful; they look wonderful together!

Shwetha+Jeff Trailer from Simply Cinematic on Vimeo.

I am attracted to all races and ethnicities, all of them. *But at times, different racial backgrounds are accompanied with different religions. For example, I’ve noticed that several of the actors I find amazingly beautiful are Jewish, haha, e.g. Joseph Gordon Levitt, Jesse Eisenberg, the Savage brothers, Shia freakin’ LaBeaouf! Granted, they may not all practice Judaism–some may just be ethnically Jewish–but I’m trying to make a point.

*note* I know that people of the same race are not all members of the same religion. But let’s not pretend, for example, that it’s not more common for an Indian to be Hindu. I was just using this as an example.

joseph gordon levitt, intermarriage, jewish actors, religion kunal nayar, race, intermarriage, marriage, religion shia labeouf, intermarriage, religion, jewish

Kunal Nayyar and Utkarsh Ambudkar are heavenly, and though extremely presumptuous of me (I’m sorry) I could say that even of they don’t practice Hinduism, maybe their families do? Those are not traditions easily broken.

And the list goes on, so on and so forth. Christians, Muslims, Jews, Buddhists, Hindus… they’re all beautiful. But they all believe differently.

Do you convert? Blend? Become tolerant? I’m just curious as to what others may think.

I’d date someone of another religion. Would it last, I don’t know. Obviously, I’d figure that out before marriage, which many fail to do. But I’m with Jesus always and forever. No one and nothing can change that 🙂

What do you think??

jackson avery and april kepner, intermarriage

Jean-Jacques Rousseau : Quote 54.

Hey everyone! How are you guys doing? I’ve been MIA, I know, I know & I apologize. I pray that you all have been well! Here is a thought for the day:

I ran across the quote below in an email that I’d save from my previous blog posts and thought I would share it again. I discovered this quote as an undergrad in a political science course that focused on philosophers like Jean-Jacques Rousseau; the passage below the quote was my initial reaction.

“I expect I shall not easily be forgiven for taking the side I have dared to take. Clashing head in with all that is today admired by men, I can only expect universal blame: and it is not for having been honored by the approbation of a few Wise men, that I should expect the approbation of the Public: Thus I have chosen my side; I do not care whether I please Wits or the Fashionable. There will always be men destined to be subjugated by the opinions of their century, their Country, their Society: Some men today act the part of a Freethinker and the Philosopher who, for some reason, would have been fanatics at the time of the League. One ought not to write for such Readers when one wants to live beyond one’s century.” – Jean-Jacques Rousseau

Not certain what this is in reference to yet, being that I’m in the preface of the book, ha, but it made me think of being a Christian. Not a poser for Christ, but someone who is a genuine Christian, Christ seeker, and lover of God..especially in today’s society. Oh the world we currently live in, sweet children; say a prayer.

At the time I applied the quote to religion–specifically Christianity, as I am a follower of Christ–and I still believe that to be true, but honestly it’s applicable to everything. No matter what, hold fast to what you believe in. Make choices based upon your own morality and your personal truth. Unfortunately society operates as one big groupthink ” a psychological phenomenon that occurs within a group of people, in which the desire for harmony or conformity in the group results in an irrational or dysfunctional decision-making outcome” for those of you who don’t know what that is. Sure, we should all be influenced by one another, and we all work together to function and coexist as a society; but, that doesn’t mean that you should change your values and beliefs on the basis of what others believe to be true. What do you believe to be true?

Live for that.

jean-jacques rousseau, life, society, quote, daily quote, religion

Differences Unite?

Religion, it’s so dividing. To say that most of them believe in some form of the same thing, they sure do ostracize one another. Christians hating Christians, Jews shunning Jews, Muslims disowning Muslims. It’s shameful to see, for religion should bring unity.

But I shall not expand on such things. What I’ve been thinking about is intermarriage, specifically in reference to religion. I’ve seen and heard of people marrying others outside of their religion, but it usually doesn’t last. Or when it does, I often wonder how? It seems that one would have to be slightly less committed to their religion to conjoin with that of another, especially those that are so contrasting.

For example, a Baptist and Methodist marrying is not nearly as extreme as a Christian and a Buddhist coming together. Even Christians and Muslims believe in the same God, but there are some differences between the two. But, how can one who believes in, say, Jesus build a family with one who worships several gods?

I am not saying in any way that these groups cannot coexist with one another, befriend, socialize, etc. But when you marry a person, you build your family’s foundation on shared values, correct? If a Christian believes that Jesus is the way and the Savior, how do they cope with the fact that, according to their beliefs, their Buddhist partner is going to hell? I don’t understand.

I only ask because I, myself, am a Christian and I love God with all of my heart. But I am also accepting, to an extent, of all people–obviously bigotry is not tolerated, but that’s not based on social attributes, but rather poor and ignorant attitudes. I love all people, as I believe Christ would have and does. Sure, I may not agree with everything but at the end of the day I do not think more highly of myself than I ought to, and I judge not others.

I am attracted to all races and ethnicities, all of them. But with different racial backgrounds comes different religions. For example, I’ve noticed that several of the actors I find amazingly beautiful are Jewish, haha, e.g. Joseph Gordon Levitt, Jesse Eisenberg, the Savage brothers, Shia freakin’ LaBeaouf! Granted, they may not all practice Judaism–some may just be ethnically Jewish–but I’m trying to make a point.

Kunal Nayyar and Utkarsh Ambudkar are heavenly, and though extremely presumptuous of me (I’m sorry) I could say that even of they may not practice Hinduism, maybe their families do? Those are not traditions easily broken.

And the list goes on, so on and so forth. Christians, Muslims, Jews, Buddhists, Hindus… they’re all beautiful. But they all believe differently.

Do you convert? Blend? Become tolerant? I’m just curious as to what others may think.

I’d date someone of another religion. Would it last, I don’t know. Obviously, I’d figure that out before marriage, which many fail to do. But I’m with Jesus always and forever. No one and nothing can change that 🙂

What do you think??