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Colourpop Ultra Matte Lip Review

Colourpop Ultra Matte Lip Lipsticks


colourpop, colourpop ultra matte lip, lipstick, matte lip, makeup, beauty

For years, I played it safe when it came to wearing lipstick. The boldest I would wear was red–and I don’t consider that very bold because everyone rocks a red lip from time to time. But lately, I’ve been adding some variety to my makeup collection and purposefully wearing more colors. I didn’t have many options on hand, so I decided to see if the company everyone was raving about would live up to the hype. The Colourpop Ultra Matte Lip liquid lipsticks and “lippie” stix were all the rave in the YouTube & Instagram communities.

colourpop, colourpop ultra matte lip, lipstick, matte lip, makeup, beauty
Left to Right: Guess, Tulle, Midi, Chilly Chili, LAX

The colors that I purchased are listed below, along with pictures of how they’re advertised and snapshots from my video. I also included a few selfies from when I wore the colors out. I’m pretty impressed! Most of the colors look great and offer a true matte finish– I get compliments every time I wear them. My favorite would be LAX, a burgundy that’s great for the winter months. My least favorite would have to be Midi, but I should have looked at the color more closely before purchasing it. It’s a summer color and definitely not suited for my skin tone. But as ridiculous as it looked, the longer I had it on, the more it grew on me.

colourpop, colourpop ultra matte lip, lipstick, matte lip, makeup, beauty, LAX colourpop, colourpop ultra matte lip, lipstick, matte lip, makeup, beauty, LAX  colourpop, colourpop ultra matte lip, lipstick, matte lip, makeup, beauty, LAX

LAX

colourpop, colourpop ultra matte lip, lipstick, matte lip, makeup, beauty, midi  colourpop, colourpop ultra matte lip, lipstick, matte lip, makeup, beauty, midi

Midi

colourpop, colourpop ultra matte lip, lipstick, matte lip, makeup, beauty, tulle  colourpop, colourpop ultra matte lip, lipstick, matte lip, makeup, beauty, tulle

Tulle

colourpop, colourpop ultra matte lip, lipstick, matte lip, makeup, beauty, guess  colourpop, colourpop ultra matte lip, lipstick, matte lip, makeup, beauty, guess colourpop, colourpop ultra matte lip, lipstick, matte lip, makeup, beauty, guess

Guess

colourpop, colourpop ultra matte lip, lipstick, matte lip, makeup, beauty, chilly chili colourpop, colourpop ultra matte lip, lipstick, matte lip, makeup, beauty, chilly chili  colourpop, colourpop ultra matte lip, lipstick, matte lip, makeup, beauty, chilly chili

Chilly Chili

I also shot a YouTube
video
, going into more detail about the colors, why I chose them and my advice on how and when to wear them. If you guys have any questions, please let me know! Or, if you’re familiar with Colourpop and their other products, let me know about those. I’m thinking of trying their lippie stix and eyeshadows. As always, stay flawlessly beautiful and live in love!

 

 Lynella!

ambi, skincare, facewash, fade cream, black women, black skincare, women of color, beauty tips

New Skincare Routine: AMBI Products

Having clear skin is not only attributed to a great daily skin care routine, but largely to what we eat, our water intake, how much sleep we’re getting and how much we’re exercising. I’ve asked several people, who have seemingly flawless skin, what their secret is and they always credit their lifestyle first. So many of them drink very few sodas, if any at all, tons of water, and they exercise. Unfortunately, I’m already starting in the negative, as my diet is so wishy-washy. I know that what I currently eat contributes to my random breakouts, and eliminating unhealthy, processed foods from my diet could stop those.

I’ve never had much of an acne problem, just breakouts related to poor eating habits. In middle school–even as a fit dancer, I might add–I would have at least one can of Sprite and a Snickers or Twix bar A DAY! Because of that, I would get random pimples or tiny bumps across my face; when I didn’t eat those things, the breakouts didn’t occur. The same thing applies present day–my body always lets me know when it’s fed up with me. To be honest, it wouldn’t be a big deal but I am always picking at everything! If I see something, blackheads, whiteheads, redness, anything, my first instinct is to try to squeeze it away; but, that’s exactly what you shouldn’t do! The only time you should try to rid yourself of a pimple is when it has a whitehead; and when you attack that sucker, it should be with a q-tip. Our skin is oily, our pores are open, and our hands are dirty. You should try to keep your hands out of your face as much as possible. But because I didn’t following this advice, I have dark scar marks. These can fade away naturally by using cocoa butter or shea butter, but it may take longer.

If you guys remember my recent LUSH post, I was trying their exfoliating wash and fading cream. I wasn’t a fan of the results, so I reverted back to a product I used in high school and college.The quality of the above photographs aren’t great, but hopefully you can tell that my skin was pretty clear. I had very few scarred marks, and because I ate healthier, it remained clearer longer. At the time, AMBI was a major part of my skin care routine; it helped fade my scarred marks and even out my skin tone. I think it worked pretty well and I saw results fairly quickly. The only negative is that the products aren’t natural. The fading cream doesn’t smell great, but that’s because you can smell the alpha hydroxy acid–aka the agent that helps with discoloration.

ambi, skincare, facewash, fade cream, black women, black skincare, women of color, beauty tips

AMBI is targeted towards women of color, and as they stated “designed for melanin-rich skin.” I purchased three items:

  • the Even & Clear Exfoliating Wash, which helps to remove dead skin cells, clear skin of pimples and breakouts, and promotes even skin tones;
  • the Even & Clear Daily Moisturizer, a lightweight moisturizer with soy and vitamins C & E, that helps to even the skin tone and reduce discolorations;
  • and the Fade Cream for Normal Skin, which helps to fade dark mark, while maintaining the natural skin tone (I should have gotten the one for oily skin).

In addition to the AMBI products, I also use Equate’s Makeup Removal Wipes as a pre-cleanser on makeup days. If you’re interested in seeing what that looks like, I’ve linked my YouTube
video
below.

My journey toward healthy, clear skin is an ongoing process, but I’m sure this will be a great start to that. If you guys have any tips or products that you love, please write about them below. Until next time!

Lynella

Why’d You Cut Your Natural Hair?!

 Brace yourself kids, ish is about to get real!

natural hair, afro, dyed hair, photography

As I’m sure most of you have noticed, I chopped off all of my natural hair. Any other time, this wouldn’t be a big deal, as I’m always cutting my hair after I get bored with it, but this was a bit different. After cutting it, I got the usual remarks:

“Omg, why’d you cut all of your hair off?”

or

“Omg I can’t believe you cut it! Whyyy? I loved your hair.”

or my favorite,

“But it was so pretty and so long!”

Thanks guys. I’m sure it’s so short and so ugly now–appreciate all of your love and support.

In most instances, I don’t care what people think about me or my hair because frankly, it’s nobody else’s business. If I wanted to go bald it shouldn’t mean a dang thing to anybody else or their mama! But this time, the haircut meant something. It was difficult for me to cut it because I knew that if I did, when I did, I would have to make it worth while. If not, what would have been the point? Here’s what I sent to my mom and sisters in a group text, you know, just to avoid any unwanted commentary whilst already in a vulnerable state:

“…I’m on a journey and I had to do something for myself. Over the past 5 years I’ve gained 70lbs. I fluctuate between 214 and 220 right now. I didn’t feel pretty anymore. My face is round, I know. I don’t need any reminders. I was eating out way to much, spending tons of money and shopping unnecessarily. I’ve been being lazy and not going after my dreams. So I cut my hair. I cut my hair because it’s a part of my journey to change. Mentally, spiritually, emotionally and physically…So, not that it matters or I owe anybody an explanation, but there ya go.”

In late October of 2014, I began my journey–one that required I start anew. These past couple of years have been interesting for me. I gained tons of weight, dropped out of graduate school twice, voluntarily moved back in with my parents and am currently using my hard-earned degree to simply work in retail–something had to change. Don’t get me wrong, retail is cool, but that is not what I had planned for my life; and although I get a kick out of it most days, it will soon grow into a place of misery. I went from living life in NYC, to settling back down in rural, South Louisiana. As I’m sure you can imagine, internally I was losing my shxt! So, I made a decision: I am going to do what I love to do and not settle for anything less than that! I am not only going to learn to love myself for who and what I am, but grow into an even better version of that and continue to love her just as much! & as my hair grows back and changes over the years, I intend to grow and change with it.

So, to any and everyone who asked or was wondering, that’s why I cut my hair–not that it’s any of your concern, my dear.

Remember, grow to love and appreciate yourself because “you see, in the final analysis, it is between you and God. It was never between you and them anyway.” -Mother Teresa

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Are any of you going through a transitional phase in your lives? Have any of you struggled with or been successful in weight loss? If so, please feel free to comment below and share your stories, tips and words of encouragement!

Love ya!

Lynella

mcdonald's

McDonald's, Hire Better People! :Racist Lady.

mcdonald's

McDonald’s, McDonald’s, you have to do better. I mean, you guys should just do better in general because your food isn’t nutritious, or real for that matter, but that’s not the topic at hand here. I chose to eat your fake food and that’s on me, but I would prefer not deal with your rude, racist employees and their commentary.

Funny thing is, most people will assume that this is about a White person– it’s not. It’s actually about a young Black woman who, I guess, decided it was okay to share her grievances with me because she assumed I’d relate? Negative, lady.

Now, for a quick recap of the night:

McDonald’s Employee: Hi, what would you like to order?

Me: Can I get a 20 piece Chicken McNugget Meal? (don’t judge me, I hadn’t eaten all day!)

McDonald’s Employee: What sauce?

Me: Sweet & Sour and BBQ

McDonald’s Employee: (insert random total) please drive to the first window.

Me: oh, I asked for the meal ma’am…

McDonald’s Employee: The 20 piece doesn’t come with a meal, only two medium drinks and two medium fries.

Me: ummm okay, well I’ll just add a medium drink and a medium fry to that please.

McDonald’s Employee: (with attitude): You’ll have to tell them to add it in at the next window because I already put your order in and saved it before you said that.

Me: (thinks to myself) are you freaking kidding me? You’re ridiculous and you can keep your ‘tude, booboo because you messed up the order, not me! (actually says aloud): Um, okay…thank you.

So, I drive up to the first window and of course I’m annoyed; but, I immediately realize that the woman who’s taking my money isn’t the same lady who took my order. I kindly ask her to add my items, pay and drive to the next window. Here, I meet homegirl. The conversation went like this:

Me: Hello.

McDonald’s Employee: ughhhh I can’t stand White people.

Me: …

McDonald’s Employee: I know that had to be a White man, couldnda been nobody but a White man.

Me: …

McDonald’s Employee: (hands me my food) Enjoy your night.

Me: Thank you.

(drives away)

Um, I’m sorry what? What just happened ma’am?

From what I gathered, this lovely McDonald’s employee greeted the customer behind me with the same outstanding customer service that she gave me. But, unlike myself, that customer probably gave her a hard time for possibly getting his order wrong. But, what do I know; this is total speculation. That guy could have been a super rude a-hole and she had every right to be upset. What she didn’t have the right to do was 1. Assume that he was White 2. Blame his attitude or response on his “Whiteness” and 3. Group all White people together due to his behavior. FYI lady, that makes you a racist.

I’m going to assume that she’s either not very good at her job or she was having a really off night because my service was terrible. When I asked for a 20 McNugget meal, your job was to tell me that you didn’t have one before not after I ordered. You’re also supposed to check with me to make sure that my order is correct before submitting it. Duh. Also, telling me that you hate White people really isn’t something that I need to know or care to hear. And just because I’m Black doesn’t mean you get to assume that I agree– I don’t.

I never know what people have experienced in their lives, and I try not to completely judge people on their ignorance. But, regardless of anything else racism is never okay. I always say: if someone of a different race said the same thing to you about your own race, would that be okay? No. You’d be quick to call them a racist and accuse them of reinforcing negative stereotypes. So, don’t so the same thing. Don’t be that guy. –or woman in this case.

So, what do you think? Was I over reacting, or do you agree that she was absolutely ridiculous and out of line?

natural hair, big hair, black hair, fro

A Phrase I Hate: “My Natural Hair.”

Yes, I probably said what you think I said: that I hate the saying/phrase/wording/whatever, “natural hair.” Do I hate naturals? No. I am one. But, saying it like that has always bothered me. I mean, think about how ridiculous that really sounds–I am wearing my natural hair. For perspective, I would never say: Ooh girl, I’m wearing my natural Black skin from now on. Like, what?

 

     fro, natural hair, dyed hair, big hairfro, natural hair, dyed hair, big hair  fro, natural hair, dyed hair, big hair

My hair has been in its natural state for 4 years now, as of June 19th. I’ve cut it on several different occasions, dyed it once, and braided it up time upon time again. I love it and I would never, ever in life relax it again! But, I have always thought that having to state that I “went natural” or “am natural” was kind of silly–no one else has to say that about their hair or anything else. 

big chop, natural hair, fade, black hair

(One week after I cut my hair in 2010)

        natural hair, twa, black hair, big chop

(One day after I chopped it all off again in 2012 because an experimental haircut didn’t go as planned! –Yes that is Nick Jonas on my door and I was def. in college. Judge all you want! Nick, knows what’s up. Lol)

When I first cut my hair, it was such a huge ordeal. Not necessarily for me, but for everyone around me. But, that’s another story for another post (if you’d like to know about the screaming, crying, yelling, and all out affair that involved me “having permission” to cut it at the age of 19, feel free to let me know! 🙂 ) Unlike a lot of naturals, I didn’t transition at all. I went straight for the BC (big chop). I cut it all by myself–and every other time to follow. People would say, Omg I didn’t know you were going natural! or What made you decide to go natural? or Omg I love your hair like that! & to that, I simply say thank you because I absolutely appreciate it. But what’s interesting is that when I got a relaxer in the 6th grade I said it once and it was never mentioned again.  

black hair, relaxed hair

(I’m thinking this was after a fresh relaxer in the 9th grade? Not entirely sure, though)

Those who have relaxed hair never have to say so. No one ever says, I love your relaxed hair (or permed hair as some say, which isn’t actually correct), or What made you get a relaxer every four weeks?, or Oh no, I’ve actually been relaxed for 7 years now! If anything, shouldn’t that be the thing that’s announced? Having my hair in its natural state is like having the brown skin on my body. It’s what I am and what I was born with, so why must I announce it as such? And you know what really trips me out? When people say:

Them: “Omg how did you get your hair like that?”

Me: “Well ,I just put water in it today, I didn’t really do anything.

Them: But noooo, how’d you get it to curl like that?

Me: Oh I didn’t do anything, I just wet it this morning. This is what it looks like. *cue nervous laughter*

Them: Oh come on girl, you had to put something in it, huh?

Me: No ma’am, this is just water. I use a few things sometimes, but I didn’t have time today and I haven’t done it in like a week. *backs away from this awkward conversation*

Like, I can’t have naturally curly hair? I have to be using Kinky Curly or something? Chill, ma’am.

[gird-gallery id=”3″]

(My hair when I actually do something to it. Twists–which are worn for at least 2 weeks–and the twist out)

And lastly, my biggest pet peeve of all: “NATURAL HAIR ISN’T FOR EVERYBODY.” If I was as rude as the people who say this, I’d politely tell them to go eff themselves. How dare you? What the heck does that even mean–the hair that grows out of my hair isn’t for me? When God made me, he somehow managed to assign me the wrong hair type? Okay, thanks for that.

No! You are absolutely incorrect. My hair is mine and you have no right to say that it’s not for everybody. Personally, I’ve never been told that it didn’t work for me, but I have had people say that they wished other people’s looked like mine or that they “rocked it the way that I do,” because it isn’t for everyone. I’ve even heard women who wear their hair in its natural state say it. Shame on you, ma’am. Shame. On. You. No one tells women with straight hair that it’s not for them. Or women with weave, or dyes. Or women of other races that their hair isn’t cool. Why the freak should I be concerned about wearing my hair? IT’S MINE! & I SHOULDN’T HAVE TO ANNOUNCE IT!

But, anyway. I understand that it’s a more complicated and in-depth discussion than that. I know that everything ties back to slavery, and segregation, and changing not just your hair, but maybe even your identity to simply be accepted. I understand that it’s a “natural hair movement” because women are regaining the confidence to be who they are. I get it and I understand.

All I’m saying is that I don’t like it. Having to announce what I am is dumb. I don’t do it for anything else and I shouldn’t have to do it for this. But that’s just me.

xoxo

Lynella!